Premeditated Gardening, Hosta Seed and “Seeds” by Thor Hanson


 Premeditated Gardening

       That’s what many gardeners practice (and we know who we are), “premeditated gardening”. We think ahead. We plan because planning is a compulsion. Let’s call it Obsessive Compulsive Gardening. It begins in about June when we ridiculously start planning for next spring even though this spring is barely over. “Next year I’m going to move that over there and that over there but then I’ll need to fill in that spot, possibly take down that maple to get more sun, maybe try a small water garden in a pot and divide and move those daylilies”. It goes on and on. We’re in Gardening Mode. It strikes at any time. October and November it does tend to slow down though. But even with the rain and shorter days you can still keep your gardening on by starting some seeds now. Spring seed starting is too frenetic. Autumn seed starting has a slower pace. You can really pay attention to the process of getting seeds to germinate and grow. Take Hosta…

Mouse Ears 1


Hosta Overload

Right about now, if you (or your neighbor) decided not to deadhead the spent flowers on Hosta plants you will have ripe Hosta seeds, suitable for replanting. Collect the seeds when they are black. That means the Hosta seeds are ripe and viable. Plant all of them in case germination is erratic. You don’t need special equipment, you can start them in the house and they germinate in about two weeks.20140520_183432

Almost all of the Hosta that we buy now are hybrids. The seed you grow from a hybrid won’t look like the original plant. It won’t come true. It will be a Hosta surprise! No two alike. Each Hosta will vary in leaf color, shape and size. This is a great project for the slower pace of autumn.

.  Growing Hosta from seed is very easy. No wonder there are so many Hosta varieties available! Of course, there is a homegrown youtube all about it.

“The Triumph of Seeds” by Thor Hanson

I really thought this was going to be a “how to” book about growing seeds. Not even close. It is far more. ”Seeds” is about the history and science surrounding the stories of grains, nuts, pulses, kernels and pips. If you like the Michael Pollan book, “Botany of Desire” and Mark Kurlansky’s book, “Salt”, you’ll love “The Triumph of Seeds” by Dr. Thor Hanson, conservation biologist and author of “Feathers” and “The Impenetrable Forest”.

Dr. Hanson begins “Seeds” with the importance of a particular seed grown in our own backyard, wheat. The enormous amount of wheat grown in Washington’s Palouse and shipped along the Snake and Columbia rivers has made this river route the third busiest grain corridor in the world…feeding millions of the world’s people.

Hanson shows how seed history has always been tied up with political, economic and human history. He points out the fascinating connections.

“Seeds” is filled with plenty of anecdotes about Hanson’s scholarly efforts to learn more about the seed world. It isn’t too “sciencey”. It’s just right. For instance, Hanson explains that there is a technical name for the dispersal of seed, endozoocory. Then he quickly follows with “We scientists have a great fondness for mash-ups in dead languages”. Science and a sense of humor make “Seeds” a good read for anybody interested in the plant world.

02b9f459390ae3332af708bdd6a67871

Hanson lives in Washington but his field of biology has taken him all over the world. He takes us for a nature-rich ride while he shares the curious importance of the relationships of seeds to everything from rats to Christopher Columbus

Seeds by Thor Hanson, $26.99, 250 pages, www.thorhanson.net