Succulents, “Autumn Joy” and “Succulents Simplified”

 

Succulent Seduction

What’s this? A trendy group of plants that is affordable?  Here’s another shocker. It’s easy to grow! Succulents (plants that store water) are showing up on more and more nursery benches and the benches aren’t only filled with common “hens and chicks.” Succulents are typically sold in 4” pots and come in all sizes and shapes, from “burro tails” to rosettes. They are easy to propagate and grow fast so save your money and stick with the 4” pots. Later in the summer sedums have sprays of white, yellow or pink straw like flowers. The fascination is with the contrasting leaves. Succulent leaves come in greens, reds and beautiful blues. They need very little water, very little soil and thrive everywhere except deep shade. They are a favorite water conservationists and vertical gardeners.

IMG_4585South Sound’s “Joy”

The most common succulent grown in South Sound gardens is definitely Sedum spectabile ‘Autumn Joy’. It’s everywhere. It’s everywhere because it is “unkillable”. S. ‘Autumn Joy’ is a tall succulent that brings a little contrast to the typical PNW garden and gives 12 months of “something”.

The fleshy bluish stems and leaves show up in March and rise to 18” by early summer. Then a large green broccoli-like flower starts forming. By late summer the flower made of hundreds of little stars changes to a rosy pink. The flower lasts about 8 weeks outside and up to a month inside in a vase. Butterfies love them. No pests go after them, not even deer. They don’t need to be staked. They are NOT invasive. They are easy to propagate by literally pulling them apart and plopping them in another well-drained, semi-sunny spot. They only look really ugly for a few weeks in the “dead” of winter… when we should all be inside watching Netflix anyway.

*Plant Nerd Alert: Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ is also called the Balloon Plant because supposedly you can take a leaf, gently squeeze the base until it opens and then blow it up like a balloon. You first.

“Succulents Simplified”

Debra Lee Baldwin’s “Succulents Simplified: Growing, Designing and Crafting With 100 Easy Varieties” is the only book you’ll need for awhile if you want to dabble in the widening world of succulents. This is Baldwin’s third book about succulents so she speaks from experience.

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She also includes Aeoniums, Agave, Aloe, Echeveria, Euphorbias, Kalanchoe, Cactus and many more along with the “usual” succulents. Fun for us! Check out the local independent nurseries for all the new “unusuals”. There are plenty of them.

Succulents come in a rainbow of colors, tiny to tall and dangerously spiky to silky soft. The creative possibilities are endless. “Succulents Simplified” is rich with examples of clever ways to use them and how to take care of them. A topiary? A tin boxful? A picture frame? Some of these projects would be good ones for kids too, probably age 5 and up…probably skipping the cactus group.

In “Succulents Simplified” Baldwin pulled together succulent propagation techniques, cultivation, clever design ideas with step by step instructions and a way-to-tempting plant list. Timber Press, 272 p. 334 color pictures, $24.95